BAKST, LEON


BAKST, LEON
BAKST, LEON (born Lev Samuilovich Rosenberg; 1864–1924), Russian artist. Born in St. Petersburg, he took the name Leon Bakst to honor his maternal grandfather. In his youth he was baptized but later returned to Judaism. At the age of 15, on the advice of the sculptor antokolski , he enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts. In 1890 he met Alexander Benois, a Russian artist who introduced Bakst to the Mir Iskusstva ("World of Art") group that tried to overcome the prevailing provincialism of Russian art and to link Russia to the West. The impresario Serge Diaghilev was a member and he employed Bakst as chief designer of costumes and décors for his ballets. From its start in Paris, in 1909, until his death, Bakst was associated with Diaghilev's Ballets Russes. The subjects for the ballets were usually taken from Russian folklore, or from Oriental tales. Bakst, with his vivid imagination and his predilection for bright color, provided an atmosphere that carried the audience into a fairyland. While his creations are no longer in use on the stage, his sketches in pencil, pen-and-ink, crayon, watercolor, gouaches, or mixed media often appear in exhibitions of Russian art. They have become particularly appreciated since the recent revival of interest in art nouveau. As a teacher at the Svanseva School in St. Petersburg, Bakst had a strong influence on the young marc chagall . -BIBLIOGRAPHY: A. Levinson, Bakst (Fr., 1924); R. Lister, The Moscovite Peacock; A Study of the Art of L. Bakst (1954). (Alfred Werner)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

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  • Bakst, Léon — orig. Lev Samuilovich Rosenberg born Jan. 27, 1866, St. Petersburg, Russia died Dec. 28, 1924, Paris, France Russian painter and stage designer. He attended the Imperial Academy of Arts at St. Petersburg and studied in Paris. In 1898 he cofounded …   Universalium

  • Bakst, Leon — (Lev Samuilovich Rosenberg) (1867–1924)    Russian artist. Bakst, born in St Petersburg, became famous as the chief decor designer for Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in Paris from 1909 onwards. His bright colours and romantic themes drawn from… …   Who’s Who in Jewish History after the period of the Old Testament

  • Bakst, Léon — orig. Lev Samuilovich Rosenberg (27 ene. 1866, San Petersburgo, Rusia–28 dic. 1924, París, Francia). Pintor y diseñador escénico ruso. Estudió en la Academia imperial de artes en San Petersburgo y en París. En 1898 cofundó la revista Mir… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Bakst, Léon — pseud. di Rosenberg, Lev Samoïlevič …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • Bakst, Leon Samoilovitch —    [pseudonym] see Rosenberg, Lev …   Dictionary of erotic artists: painters, sculptors, printmakers, graphic designers and illustrators

  • Bakst, Leon (Rosenberg Lev Samuilovich) — (1867 1924)    Russian artist. Born in St Petersburg, he was baptized and later returned to Judaism. He was employed by Sergey Diaghilev as chief designer of costumes for his ballets. He had an deep influence on Marc Chagall …   Dictionary of Jewish Biography

  • Léon Bakst — Léon Samoilovitch Bakst (May 10, 1866 December 28,1924) was a Russian painter and scene and costume designer who revolutionized the arts he worked in. Born as Lev (Leib) Rosenberg, he was also known as Leon (Lev) Nikolayevich Bakst (Леон (Лев)… …   Wikipedia

  • Leon Bakst — Bakst, Selbstbildnis Léon Bakst (russisch Лев Самойлович Бакст, Lew Samoilowitsch Bakst, ursprünglich Lew Samoilowitsch Rosenberg; * 10. Mai 1866 in Grodno; † 28. Dezember 1924 in Paris) war ein russisch französischer …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bakst — Bakst, Selbstbildnis Léon Bakst (russisch Лев Самойлович Бакст, Lew Samoilowitsch Bakst, ursprünglich Lew Samoilowitsch Rosenberg; * 10. Mai 1866 in Grodno; † 28. Dezember 1924 in Paris) war ein russisch französischer …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bakst, LéonNikolaevich — Bakst (bäkst), Léon Nikolaevich. 1866 1924. Russian painter and scenic designer who modernized theater design. His best known works were for ballets produced by Sergei Diaghilev in Paris. * * * …   Universalium


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